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Thread: 3D modeling laptp

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  1. #1 Cool 3D modeling laptp 
    Hey guys, I know there is a mixture of professions on this page, maybe someone could lend me a hand.
    I do 3D design for work, but my laptop as of now cannot handle the stress and abuse I put it through. I have been doing some research but cant decide which one is the best. currently I am missing ram, I need a minimum of 16GB
    ASUS ROG has a few great models
    MSI WS72 (i have never heard of) but is said to be great for design
    HP ZBook

    What are your thoughts? Any help is appreciated whether is word of mouth or personal experience
    I would be willing to spend up to $2500 give or take a few hundred.
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  2. #2 Default  
    What are you modeling, are you going to be doing high-res renders on it? Is the work photo real or mostly CAD based?

    I work in 3D as well and we build our systems with emphasis on GPU and CPU power over RAM. We're using V-Ray and rendering at high resolutions w/photorealism being the end goal. So the 1080Ti cards let us work with lots of high poly models in one scene and the Xeon CPU's handle the rendering quickly. For RAM we have 64Gb but could get away with 16-32Gb since the software doesn't really depend on much and we're really mostly using Photoshop and standard apps.

    So if I had to build a laptop I'd get the one that offered the best GPU if you are doing complex modeling w/little rendering, or the fastest i7 CPU if you plan on doing heavy rendering too. But there are services out there that offer render farms that charge by the hour (Amazon Prime does this) so you could put your money into a good GPU with larger screen over CPU power and offload your rendering to something else.

    Gaming laptops are a great place to start.
    '00 Mercury Cougar V6 5spd | '13 Ford Fusion SE 2.0l Ecoboost | My site: Skolenimation
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  3. #3 Default  
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    I was curious how much of this was done with the GPU vs CPU.

    Is it more beneficial to maximize system RAM or graphics RAM?

    -Justin
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  4. #4 Default  
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    Are you dead set on a laptop? Do you work all over the place, or do you do most of your work in one place and then only use the laptop for basic things? I'd advise going with a desktop instead of a laptop unless you absolutely need the portability.

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin.b View Post
    I was curious how much of this was done with the GPU vs CPU.

    Is it more beneficial to maximize system RAM or graphics RAM?

    -Justin
    You can always add more RAM, you're stuck with whatever amount of VRAM your graphics card has. Which is more important is going to depend entirely on your application.
    "It was more passionate than just cuddling"
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  5. #5 Default  
    From my experience I'd say graphics RAM. I can't speak for other software, but we use 3Ds Max and I'm sure like other apps the GPU is used primarily for the viewports and modeling. So the better the card there the smoother the frame rate when working with complex or dense models. Viewing textures or lighting in real time (see Cycles for Blender) would also benefit from a good GPU (ours have 6Gb of RAM).

    Now, if you start using procedural based rendering software like Quixel or Substance Designer a top-end GPU is a must because that's akin to playing a game on ultra settings.

    CPU's handling the rendering side of things in most cases (Blender lets you choose between GPU and CPU). So the better that is the quicker you can render out images, or bump the quality of said renders so they don't have noise. So they're better towards the end of the pipeline, but there are services out there that will do the rendering for you on hundreds of computers for an hourly rate. So you could get away with an i5 CPU and just offload all your rendering when needed.
    '00 Mercury Cougar V6 5spd | '13 Ford Fusion SE 2.0l Ecoboost | My site: Skolenimation
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  6. #6 Default  
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    Quote Originally Posted by splatt View Post
    Are you dead set on a laptop? Do you work all over the place, or do you do most of your work in one place and then only use the laptop for basic things? I'd advise going with a desktop instead of a laptop unless you absolutely need the portability.

    You can always add more RAM, you're stuck with whatever amount of VRAM your graphics card has. Which is more important is going to depend entirely on your application.
    With laptops, you're usually stuck with RAM limits also. I know mine has a weird limit of 20GB (4GB on-board and 1 16GB stick). I'm not sure if the mobile workstations / gaming laptops have different limits.

    -Justin
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  7. #7 Default  
    Quote Originally Posted by splatt View Post
    Are you dead set on a laptop? Do you work all over the place, or do you do most of your work in one place and then only use the laptop for basic things? I'd advise going with a desktop instead of a laptop unless you absolutely need the portability.



    You can always add more RAM, you're stuck with whatever amount of VRAM your graphics card has. Which is more important is going to depend entirely on your application.
    I used to use a pc but over time I found it easier to have my laptop, this way i can pull it out where every I go. A lot of my work is time sensitive so on the go is best.
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  8. #8 Default  
    Quote Originally Posted by LastMercury View Post
    What are you modeling, are you going to be doing high-res renders on it? Is the work photo real or mostly CAD based?

    I work in 3D as well and we build our systems with emphasis on GPU and CPU power over RAM. We're using V-Ray and rendering at high resolutions w/photorealism being the end goal. So the 1080Ti cards let us work with lots of high poly models in one scene and the Xeon CPU's handle the rendering quickly. For RAM we have 64Gb but could get away with 16-32Gb since the software doesn't really depend on much and we're really mostly using Photoshop and standard apps.

    So if I had to build a laptop I'd get the one that offered the best GPU if you are doing complex modeling w/little rendering, or the fastest i7 CPU if you plan on doing heavy rendering too. But there are services out there that offer render farms that charge by the hour (Amazon Prime does this) so you could put your money into a good GPU with larger screen over CPU power and offload your rendering to something else.

    Gaming laptops are a great place to start.
    I am not modeling anything to crazy at the moment but my boss always comes up with great ideas that he wants made a reality. So I want to be able to handle not only easy designs but also complex ones.
    ex. I was modeling a v12 motor a few weeks ago (just for fun) while assembling it my computer went nuts, It couldnt handle everything I was throwing at it. not to mention the rendering that took place afterward.

    I design for: https://www.carnageatelier.com/
    We make everything, luggage, Minimalist wallets, phone cases, and just started doing steering wheels. But everything is custom, so If you want engravings done or a different material for your product thats not a problem.
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  9. #9 Default  
    You could probably get away with a good gaming laptop then. The more LED's the betters obvs. Using Keyshot for your product renders on site shouldn't tax it too much in that respect.
    '00 Mercury Cougar V6 5spd | '13 Ford Fusion SE 2.0l Ecoboost | My site: Skolenimation
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  10. #10 Default  
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    I forgot to mention it earlier, but don't worry if you've never heard of MSI. They're a very well established company that has been making highly regarded motherboards for years.
    "It was more passionate than just cuddling"
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  11. #11 Default  
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    Quote Originally Posted by splatt View Post
    I forgot to mention it earlier, but don't worry if you've never heard of MSI. They're a very well established company that has been making highly regarded motherboards for years.
    My brother-in-law thought he would get into PC gaming and bought an MSI. I don't believe he's done any gaming on it.

    -Justin
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  12. #12 Default  
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    The majority of my day is spent in Catia V5 or Solidworks CAD doing different levels of 3D design and surfacing. I am also usually in Smart team, one or two isntances of Excell, word, Outlook, ERP, and web browsing through the day and have had really good luck with my new work laptop. They bought me a Dell M6800 with a 17" screen, I really like the professional Dell laptops anyway and I am very happy with this. The two other CAD heavy engineers have the same laptop and it has worked out great. It is not a cheap laptop, I have no problems with very heavy 3D assemblies in Catia V5, and Solidworks.

    Specs:

    Win 7 Pro
    I7 @2.8ghz
    32 gigs of Ram
    500 gig SSD primary drive
    M.Sata PCI expansion slot for a second HDD
    Nvida Quadro K2200M graphics card

    Get a backlit keyboard, they didn't get one for mine and I wish I could have told them to add it. I have it on my older Latitude and it is excellent.


    Doubt the kink will work, but if it does, this is what is configured in my laptop. Price is $2300
    http://configure.us.dell.com/dellsto...b=1&vw=classic
    Matt
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  13. #13 Default  
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    I got a backlit keyboard on my current laptop. I have used it a lot less than I had expected.

    -Justin
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  14. #14 Default  
    Quote Originally Posted by [cerberus] View Post
    The majority of my day is spent in Catia V5 or Solidworks CAD doing different levels of 3D design and surfacing. I am also usually in Smart team, one or two isntances of Excell, word, Outlook, ERP, and web browsing through the day and have had really good luck with my new work laptop. They bought me a Dell M6800 with a 17" screen, I really like the professional Dell laptops anyway and I am very happy with this. The two other CAD heavy engineers have the same laptop and it has worked out great. It is not a cheap laptop, I have no problems with very heavy 3D assemblies in Catia V5, and Solidworks.

    Specs:

    Win 7 Pro
    I7 @2.8ghz
    32 gigs of Ram
    500 gig SSD primary drive
    M.Sata PCI expansion slot for a second HDD
    Nvida Quadro K2200M graphics card

    Get a backlit keyboard, they didn't get one for mine and I wish I could have told them to add it. I have it on my older Latitude and it is excellent.


    Doubt the kink will work, but if it does, this is what is configured in my laptop. Price is $2300
    http://configure.us.dell.com/dellsto...b=1&vw=classic
    thanks! ill look into those specs!
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